Parent-Teacher Conference Time

It’s that time of year again – Parent Teacher Conferences.

Parent- Teacher conferences are the best time to talk with your child’s teacher and discuss what is best for your child academically. Both, parent and teacher are vital in a student’s education.

A Parent – Teacher Conference should be a two-way conversation, with all talking and listening.  This is the parent’s opportunity to learn about the child’s progress. You can see the data about your child’s absences, grades and test scores. Ask to see your child’s work and how the teacher gives grades. During this time, the parent has the opportunity to tell the teacher information about the child’s needs, so the teacher can help your child more.

The primary focus of this conference is to establish how the child can do better. Be sure to have your questions ready, to ensure that you obtain all the information you need and to keep the conference focused on the primary goal — helping your child do better in school.

Ask questions like the following:

  • Is my child performing at grade level?
  • How is he/she doing compared to the rest of the class?
  • What are his/her strengths?
  • How could he/she improve?
  • What can I do at home to help my child learn or improve?
  • Are there other programs that could help my child?
  • How can you (the teacher) both challenge my child and support my child when he/she needs it?

Gathering information is important during this time, but most importantly, you and the teacher need to make a plan. This written plan is the things that you and the teacher will do to support your child. You can do this during the conference or after.  Write down what you will do, when and how often and check in frequently with the teacher in the coming months.

Schedule another time to talk, if you still have questions or concerns.  The teacher is there to help your child learn and you are an important part of the process. Feel free to email your teacher with concerns, as they arise and schedule other conferences when needed.

Lastly, talk to your child about what you learned at the conference. Talk about how you will help him at home and ask for any suggestions from him.

Education involves a team — Teacher, Parents and Students.  Being an active part of the team will yield great gains for your student’s education.

Here is a checklist for your next Parent-Teacher Conference.

Parent_Teacher_Conf_Checklist

If you need assistance, please feel free to contact me, Scarlet Sanders, Family Engagement Specialist at 478-836-3426 ext 132 or via email scarlet.sanders@crawfordschools.org.

Make your Parent – Teacher Conference A Success!!

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Where are the answers?

Often we have questions, but are not sure where to go for the answers.

  • My kids get off the bus before I get home from work. Who can watch my kids?
  • Johnny, my son, is struggling in math. How can I help him?
  • My daughter has ADHD. I don’t know how to help her.
  • Homework and study time at our house is frustrating. I’m at my wits end. Help!!

There are answers to these questions within reach. Where, you ask?

Crawford County Schools Parent & Family Resource Center

96 Manor Street, Roberta

Scarlet Sanders, Family Engagement Specialist

478-836-3426 extension 132

 

Crawford County Schools Parent & Family Resource Center, funded by Title I, is available to all families in Crawford County.  The Parent & Family Resource Center has a lending library of books, games and other resources, as well as internet access for parents and family members.

Scarlet Sanders, Family Engagement Specialist, is available to assist in acquiring any resources or information that you need to assist your students achieve academic success.  She will work with you to get the information that you need for your family.

 

Preparing for a Successful School Year

Great article to read  with teachers best advice to help children succeed at school.

The little things will make a big difference.

My Top Pick things to do from the list:

  1. Establish and stick to a bed time!
  2. Read every night!
  3. Spend time with children having conversations!
  4. Review what your student brings home from school.
  5. Teach children to respect teachers and school.
  6. Monitor your child’s progress. Schedule teacher conference to discuss problems before they become major issues.
  7. Allow your students to have a healthy struggle in their academics. (Students need to be challenged in their critical thinking skills and a healthy struggle makes a better student.) Encourage your students, don’t give them the answers.
  8. Build a relationship with your student’s teacher(s).

May you have a great 2017-2018 school year at Crawford County Schools.

If you need assistance, please feel free to email or call me.

Scarlet Sanders, Family Engagement Specialist

(478)836-3426 extension 132

scarlet.sanders@crawfordschools.org

 

 

Where Did Summer Go?

Summer is drawing to a close!! It is time to gear up to return to school.

  • Have your students complete their reading logs for Eagle Bucks and other incentives when they return to school.
  • Have high school students complete the required reading, if applicable.
  • Purchase those school supplies.

Elementary School Supply Lists are available.

Middle School Supply Lists are available.

  • Attend Open House on Tuesday, August 8, 2017 from 4:00PM – 7:00PM to meet your child’s teacher.
  • After meeting the teachers, pick up your Free School Supplies and visit community resources on Tuesday, August 8 sponsored by the Crawford County Family Connections.  Visit our Facebook page (@ccfamilyengage) for the location.
  • Wake up bright and early on Friday, August 11 for school.  Yay!! School year 2017-2018 will finally begin.  We look forward to seeing those smiling faces!!!

 

Visit this blog for tips and other resources throughout the year.

Grand Opening of Parent & Family Resource Center

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We have officially opened the new Parent & Family Resource Center, located at 96 Manor Street, Roberta (beside the high school basketball gym). There will be a variety of resources at this easily accessible facility, which will include family workshops, computers with internet access, books, games and other resources.
District Family Engagement Specialist Scarlet Sanders and Parent Mentor Michelle Olandez will be available to assist families with questions or direction to necessary resources.
Visit the new Parent & Family Resource Center at your earliest convenience. The hours of operation are 8 am to 4 pm, Monday – Friday, or by appointment for other hours.
For more information, please contact Scarlet Sanders at (478)836-3426 extension 132 or scarlet.sanders@crawfordschools.org.

Literacy Activity #3

Literacy Activity #3: Explore print and language in the real world.

Reading books is important, but children must be aware that print and our language is in the real world. Being aware that our world consist of language and print rich environments will emphasize the importance of literacy.

Here are a few ways to explore print and language in the real world.

  1. Young children: Point to signs, labels, etc. in the grocery story and identify the different sounds. Have the child tell you the sound and play a game of other words or sounds that are alike.
  2. Young Children: Sing nursery rhymes and have lots of conversations to help build a rich vocabulary and strong oral language skills.
  3. Young children: Ask the child to tell a story by drawing pictures and then “reading” their story to you.
  4. Use a cookbook or recipe to show your child how to follow steps to make a batch of cooks.
  5. Play a board game like Scrabble to practice reading skills, and to expand vocabulary.
  6. Listen to audio books together as a family.
  7. Read the newspaper, magazine, menus or other forms of print with your child.

Share your ideas of how you expose your children to print and language in the real world.

Literacy At Home Activity #2

Literacy at home activity for week #2 :  Initiate dinner table discussions with your children.  

You and your children don’t need to read the same books to have dinner table conversations about the books.  I know my children are interested in what I am reading. Of course, I don’t discuss the entire plot of the story with them, but I do give them a brief kid-friendly synopsis of the book.

Talk about the books they are reading. Ask them questions that will encourage a discussion, such as:

  • 1) What is the main topic of the book?
  • 2) Where is the story set? How do you know?
  • 3) What do you think will happen next?
  • 4) How does this book compare to another one you have read on this topic?

Let the conversation flow naturally.  As the conversation flows, you will have other questions, as you  let your student talk about the book.  Share what you are reading too,  but remember to share appropriate content with them.